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Thursday, February 28, 2013

Catsimatidis Expects Carrion To Drop Out of Mayoral Race

In an interview to Jewish Political Radio - The Spin ClassMayoral candidate John Catsimatidis indicated he might be behind the Daily News story that broke today on Adolfo Carrion helping a major developer who had arranged to provide him with an architect for home renovations.

Speaking to Radio host Michael Fragin, Catsimatidis indicated he might seek the nomination of the Independence Party, expressing confidence Carrion would drop out of the race

Interview with Sal Albanese - The Outsider Who Wants to Be Seen Inside

Before I even managed to utter a word, Democratic mayoral candidate Sal Albanese smiled and asked me: "So, you are going to ask me about the Quinnipiac poll?" which, honestly, was my intention to ask in the first place. Despite the media exposure he has received over the years in public office, Albanese, who is running for mayor for the third time, was excluded from the Quinnipiac's polling question in a poll released today on the Democratic mayoral primary. In the latest Marist poll released two weeks ago, Albanese pulled in a mere 2 percent of support, falling short from the 21% he got in the 1997 primary. "I am only 7 points behind John Liu," he laughed.

Hispanic Pastor Promises to Repeal Metzitzah B'peh Regulation

While the mayoral candidates, other than Bill de Blasio who's a proud progressive, on the Democratic and Republican side are touting their liberal social views but fiscal conservative policies,There's one guy out there, unnoticed, that is the opposite of all. Erick Salgado, a Hispanic Pastor backed by Reuben Diaz Sr., presents himself as a social conservative and a fiscal liberal. Oh, and he's running in the Democratic primaries for mayor of NYC.

Wednesday, February 27, 2013

Quinnipiac Poll Shows Quinn with Commanding Lead Over Opponents

Christine Quinn has not yet officially announced her candidacy for Mayor on NYC, but her lead over her opponents is only growing and almost reaching the threshold of 40% to avoid run-off, according to the latest Quinnipiac poll published Wednesday morning. 

In the Democratic primary for mayor, Quinn leads with 37 percent, more than the three other serious candidates combined, according to the poll. Public Advocate Bill de Blasio has 14 percent, with 11 percent for 2009 Democratic mayoral candidate William Thompson and 9 percent for Comptroller John Liu. Another 27 percent are undecided.

Tuesday, February 26, 2013

McDonald Kindly Clears The Path For Competitor Joe Lhota

One of the known Talmudic teachings talks about the characteristics of different types of people with regard to wealth: ('Ethics of the Fathers' - Chapter 5, Mishnah 10)- "There are four characteristics among people: One who says, "Mine is mine and yours is yours," that is the mark of the average person; some say that is the mark [of the people] of Sodom. [One who says,] "Mine is yours and yours is mine," [that is the mark of] an ignorant person. [He who says,] "Mine is yours and yours is yours," [that is the mark of] a godly [person]. [One who says,] "Yours is mine and mine is mine," [that is the mark of] an evil person." 

Why Early Poll Numbers Should Not Get Us Emotionally Sure-Footed

Don't tell me you're convinced that the mayoral frontrunner is at this point will indeed emerge as the favorite once campaign kicks in full steam. Looking back at 2009, Mayor Michael Bloomberg was coasting to a convincing victory, as a Quinnipiac University poll showed the mayor with a commanding 12-point lead over Bill Thompson, the Democratic challenger. A Marist College poll, released four days before the election, gave Bloomberg a 15-point advantage. But as the returns started streaming in on election night, the mayor’s lead evaporated, squeaking out at the end of the night a mere win of 4.6%.

McDonald Looking To Cash In Campaign Finance Victory

Republican Mayoral candidate George McDonald scored a small, but significant, win in court yesterday: For the time being, he can collect campaign donations that are legal under state law but exceed the $4,950-per-donor limit imposed by the city, the NYPost reports

Catsimatidis Would Only Consider Banning 32 oz Soda Cups

At a press conference at the foot of the Verrazano Bridge in Brooklyn this afternoon, with Assemblywoman Nicole Malliotakis at his side, mayoral candidate John Catsimatidis was asked by Ross Barkan from Politicker about Mayor Michael Bloomberg’s controversial plan to ban high-sugar drinks in cups or containers bigger than 16 ounces. 

“I wouldn’t want my kids to drink 32 ounce sodas,” said Mr. Catsimatidis, explaining that he would also want more health education programs put in public schools. “When I went to the movies a couple of weeks ago and I looked at the 32 oz soda and it said 1,100 calories, wow, never in a million years would I buy that one!”  

Mr. Catsimatidis also promised a mysterious press conference in Brooklyn next week. “Stay tuned to next week. We saved jobs in Brooklyn nobody knows about,” he told Politicker.

Monday, February 25, 2013

Will Catsimatidis's Fortune Dignify His Candidacy?

Republican mayoral candidate has not yet hired a pollster, although its in the makings according to his campaign manager, but he was fast enough to dismiss the latest poll showing him with a mere 5% of support among NYC Republican voters. 

“I love when they underestimate me,” he told The Daily News. “People have been underestimating me from a little Greek island to 135th St to top of American industry.” 

Friday, February 22, 2013

Republican Mayoral Candidates Introduce Themselves to BK Conservative Party

Three of the potential Republican mayoral candidates met a welcoming crowd at the first Brooklyn Young Conservative Club' Presidents Day dinner Thursday night. Joe Lhota, George McDonald and Adolfo Carrion, who came with an Independence party slot in pocket addressed the crowd in acknowledging the significance of the Conservative party's growing base in Southern Brooklyn.

Former MTA chief and the favorite candidate in the Republican party, Joe Lhota introduced his candidacy by quipping: "I am Joe Lhota, and I am running for Mayor of NYC."

Channeling Jimmy McMillan's gubernatorial run in 2010 theme, Lhota reminded the crowd of the rent is too damn high slogan, saying "I will be the candidate who will say over and over: "The government is too damn expensive."


"The job is too complicated for on the job training," Lhota said while touting his experience in the private and public sector as the best equipped for the job and challenges "on day one."

"We are going to have an interesting race," Lhota said while pointing out the presence of Adolfo Carrion, presenting him as a third party candidate. "I think it is going to be very interesting to see how one can win this race," he added. Lhota's  confidence lays in the belief, as he expressed later on in a private conversation that Carrion's candidacy will do more harm to the potential Democratic nominee.

Adolfo Carrion, who spoke right after him, briefly introduced himself as the one that could bring New Yorkers together. Adding that he's looking forward "to a robust discussion of the future of our city."

George McDonald also addressed the crowd by touting his experience in providing help for the homeless, "not by going to Bain Capital, but to main capital."

McDonald was approached by the Observer's Colin Campbell who asked him whether he is also Jewish,  seen that every Republican candidate has somehow found some Jewish connection to their personal life. Shockingly, McDonald revealed that his wife is Jewish.